How Does Alcohol Cause Cancer?

160209-alcohol-acetaldehyde-update

Infographic credit Cancer Research UK.

TONI ABBEY | September 15, 2016

(Reprinted with permission from the Dana-Farber Blog)

In a cabinet in London’s British Museum nestles a 5,300 year-old wedged-shaped tablet called a cuneiform. On its surface is scrawled one of the earliest forms of written language in the world.

And it’s a record of Mesopotamian workers’ beer rations.

Clearly, humanity’s relationship with alcohol stretches back thousands of years, but a long relationship doesn’t necessarily mean a healthy one.

We know that alcohol is damaging to our health in a number of ways – including an impact on cancer risk.

There’s concrete evidence that it causes cancer and that drinking less reduces your risk of developing the disease.

But we haven’t yet explored the science behind how alcohol affects and damages our cells, and how this can cause the cells in our bodies to develop into cancer. Read More

Share

Your Survivorship Care Plan

Once your treatment is complete, the focus of your care swiftly changes from therapy to healing, recovery, and prevention. One way to guide your care moving forward is through a document called a Survivorship Care Plan – a blueprint for managing your future care. Anyone can get a survivorship care plan, at any time, throughout their cancer journey.

web-card-graphic-1This document has two parts – an end of treatment summary and a care plan. The end of treatment summary condenses the history of your cancer and its treatments. This information is then used by your oncology team to create your care plan, which includes the recommendations for managing your health and cancer monitoring moving forward.

An end of treatment summary will be created by the oncology team that treated you. Some survivors have found it difficult to locate their treatment summary information further down the road, so it is important for you to request this once treatment ends, or soon thereafter.

web-card-graphic-2If you are no longer being seen by an oncologist, you may consider contacting the office or the hospital where you were treated to get a summary of the treatment you received. You may also consider obtaining a copy of your medical records – particularly your pathology report, a copy of the imaging reports, and a disk with your actual scans on them to attach to your entire Survivorship Care Plan.

Once you have your Survivorship Care Plan in hand, share it with other members of your healthcare team. Sharing this information will ensure your future health monitoring and preventive care moving forward.

Cancer Survivorship Care Plans: What You Need to Know

This video was created by the California Dialogue on Cancer, California Public Health, and Triage Cancer to help you understand the goals and elements of survivorship care plans. It provides a variety of ways to obtain a survivorship care plan.

On Your Own: Starting Your Personal Survivorship Care Plan

If you are unable to obtain a care plan from your oncology team, it is still important document your care and obtain a plan for life after cancer. Your first step is to get a summary of your treatments from your oncology provider. Choose and print one of the templates below, and begin to fill-in as much information as you can. Then, make an appointment with your oncology provider to review and complete the missing pieces. It is important keep a copy of your completed Survivorship Care Plan for yourself and to share it with the other members of your healthcare team. This gives everyone a better understanding  of how you will be monitored after your treatment ends. This information is powerful – the more you understand your plan of care going forward, the better prepared you are to enlist your entire team to help you heal, recover, and stay healthy.

What’s Next? Life After Cancer TreatmentWhat's Next

The Minnesota Cancer Alliance has created this Cancer Survivor Care Plan booklet to help you keep track of the details of your cancer treatment, talk to your healthcare provider about your symptoms, to understand the short and long-term side effects from your treatments, and manage your follow-up care. This booklet can help you develop a plan to take care of your physical, emotional, and practical needs and concerns related to post-treatment survivorship. You can order a free copy from the Minnesota Cancer Alliance here.

Journey Forward My Care Plan

My Care PlanAfter printing My Care Plan, fill in the general information and self-assessment to the best of your ability. Then, work with your oncology team to fill in the details of the Treatment Summary and Follow-up Care sections. Go to Journey Forward to learn more about the process and resources. Be sure to visit the Journey Forward Survivorship Library. The template is also available as a free mobile app (iOS and Android).

oncolinklife-logo@2xLIVESTRONG Care Plan powered by Penn Medicine’s OncoLink

This is an online tool you can use by completing questions about your cancer treatment experience, which are then used to create a survivorship care plan that you can print out and take to your oncology and primary care team to review. OncoLink has a large collection of the potential late and long-term side effects from treatment.

SGO Survivorship ToolkitThe Society of Gynecological Oncology (SGO) Survivorship Toolkit

The Society of Gynecologic Oncology has developed a number of resources for cancer survivors to help guide you on the next steps after treatment. They include care plans to download for survivors of cervical, endometrial, and vulvar cancers. General follow-up recommendations and post-treatment self-care plans for these cancers are also available.

These are meant to be printed and filled in to the best of your ability. They should be completed alongside your cancer care team, and used in addition to their follow-up and monitoring recommendations. Remember to share your Survivorship Care Plan with all of your healthcare providers.

Helping You Move Forward

10 Tips to Help You Navigate Life After Cancer and the New Normal

Great tips from an article in Cure Today, written by the cancer support community, IHadCancer. The goal of IHadCancer is to make connections that prevent the feeling of isolation experienced by those who have been affected by cancer. In addition to offering the ability to connect with others who may be experiencing the same journey, there is an array of resources and articles written by survivors on survivorship topics.

FFLACTFacing Forward: Life After Cancer Treatment

The NIH National Cancer Institute has compiled this booklet for people who have finished their cancer treatments. The booklet is free and can be downloaded to print or to a tablet device, such as a Kindle. The information provides answers to questions and concerns patients and survivors might have to help them understand what life is like after cancer treatments end.

 

Journey Forward Survivorship Library for Survivors

Journey Forward has a collection of topics, including information on late and long-term effects and other survivorship care links to credible resources for patients and families.

Dana Farber – Living Well Beyond Cancer: Experts Speak on Adult Survivorship Topics

Dana Farber was one of the first hospitals in the nation to begin acknowledging survivorship as a true phase of the cancer journey. Individuals who have survived cancer may face many challenges resulting from their cancer and treatments. Dana Farber has brought together experts from many fields to talk about the variety of issues cancer survivors face. There are 21 different topics, including nutrition, the importance of follow-up care, physical exercise, learning about symptoms to report to your doctor, fear of recurrence, and creating a survivorship care plan. They also have wonderful Information Sheets for Cancer Survivors, and a Cancer Survivorship Blog with timely topics to help cancer patients and survivors stay on top of what’s new in the cancer survivorship realm.

Dana Farber – Health Library on Survivorship Topics

Dana Farber has a variety of webinars and videos designed to help you gain an understanding of the issues related to a healthy survivorship. These videos are an exceptional way to learn about the challenges you, as a cancer survivor, could now be facing.

A List of Specialized Survivorship Clinics 

There are clinics nationwide that have specific training, knowledge, and management skills for the late and long-term effects of cancer and its treatments. This resource from OncoLink helps patients and healthcare providers locate these clinics.

Save

Save

Share

Finding Support

Brother and sister sitting on a rock in a beautiful trail in the woodsOne of the most important gifts you can be given in the post-treatment phase of survivorship is a good understanding what your needs are. Getting the support for those needs is essential to heal your body, mind, and soul, and to move forward. Support from your family, friends, and physician is vital to help you cope with the emotional, practical, and financial obstacles, and the side effects of your treatments. Please talk to your healthcare provider so they can partner with you to find the help and resources you need.

CancerCare Post-Treatment Survivorship Support Group

This is a 15-week online support group for people who have completed their cancer treatment. It’s led by an oncology social worker, and participants support each other and share resources and information. You will need to complete an online registration process. Once you have joined the group you can read messages 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Cancer Support Community

An international non-profit dedicated to providing support, education and hope to people affected by cancer. They provide online emotional support, education, and a program called Open to Options™ which provides counselors who can help cancer patients organize and prioritize their questions, concerns, goals and values before oncology visits. This program is available in English and Spanish, and helps patients make informed decisions about their care.

CancerCare Survivorship Podcasts

CancerCare offers Connect Educational workshops and Podcasts about a variety of topics (scroll to the lower part of the podcast link to see them). These sessions are for people who have completed cancer treatment, and who are in the post-treatment survivorship phase. The topics include managing late and long term side effects from treatment, communicating with your healthcare team, caregiving, fear of recurrence, workplace transitions, chemo brain, managing stress, intimacy, and more.

Finding a Therapist Who Can Help You Heal

Helpguide.org is a trusted source of mental, emotional and social help. This guide will help you choose an effective therapist to help you become stronger, more self-aware, and empowered as an active participant in your care.

Cancer Support Communities in Southwest Colorado & Northwest New Mexico

Though we are a group of small communities, we do have some supportive care programs for individuals who are going through different phases of cancer. Blueprints of Hope’s updated list of support organizations in our region includes support groups for grief and loss, caregivers, fertility, exercise, mentoring for hereditary cancers, and those which are specific to individual types of cancers. Building a community of supportive services for cancer survivors is a work in progress, so if you don’t find something that works for you, let us know.

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Share

Healthy Living

Young woman on the marketFor many survivors, living a healthy lifestyle may lower the risk of recurrence and improve survival rate. Studies have not shown that healthy behaviors alone impact cancer survival, but they may help protect against other chronic diseases and cancers.  Following are guidelines, tools and booklets to help you work with your healthcare team to make healthy lifestyle choices. These choices include aiming for a healthy weight, eating healthy whole foods, getting regular exercise, keeping up with your immunizations, and not smoking.

Some insurance companies are now offering online health monitoring tools to help make it easier for their members to meet their personal health goals and develop a healthier lifestyle. Participating in these plans may not only help you set and achieve your goals, but they may lower your insurance premiums or qualify you for other benefits, including the services of a Healthy Lifestyle Coach. It may be beneficial to ask if that is a benefit available to you.

Guidelines for Nutrition and Physical Activity  

ACS Guidelines on Nutrition and Physical Activity for Cancer Survivors

The American Cancer Society (ACS) gathered a group of experts in nutrition, physical activity, and cancer survivorship to look at the scientific evidence and best practices related to optimal nutrition and physical activity after the diagnosis of cancer.  These guidelines are written to provide health and wellness guidelines to help them move toward a healthier lifestyle. “ACS Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines.”

Nutrition

AICR’s Heal Well Guide

The American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR) has collaborated with Meals to Heal and the LIVESTRONG Foundation to produce this free, printable PDF resource. Adapted in part from AICR’s CancerResource and other sources, Heal Well (PDF) is a booklet that offers overall guidance to help you eat healthfully throughout and beyond your treatment. Making changes to your eating habits, living an active lifestyle, and aiming for a healthy body weight can help prevent cancer and lower the risk of some cancers returning. Please visit with your physician or a registered dietician if you need help mapping out your exercise or nutrition goals.

Rebecca Katz’s Website

Ms. Katz shares the love of whole healthy foods through her recipes, blog, and her book “The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen.” Her experience with cancer comes from cooking for her father while he was going through treatment. She works for Healing Kitchens at Commonweal, a program dedicated to training doctors and wellness professionals how to add cooking into the role of health and healing.

NutritionFacts.Org

Michael Greger, MD is a licensed general practitioner, an author, and internationally recognized speaker on nutrition. He is a founding member of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, and a specialist in clinical nutrition. This website provides short videos on the latest in nutrition research. The goal of Nutrition Facts is to “present you and your doctor with the results of the latest in peer-reviewed nutrition and health research” in an understandable way.

Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) Dirty Dozen

EWG is a great site to find clean products to eat, including fish with safer levels of contaminants and safer products to use on your skin and in your home. They created the Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce™ and the Shopper’s Guide to All 48 Fruits and Vegetables with Pesticide Residue Data.

Nutrition & Exercise

Managing Your Weight After a Cancer Diagnosis

Cancer.Net’s booklet can empower you to talk with your health care team about setting goals for losing weight and to find resources to help you reach those goals. The booklets is available in English, French and Spanish.

Healthy Weight and Diet for Breast Cancer – Susan Komen Foundation

These are recommendations for maintaining a healthy lifestyle for people who have experienced a breast cancer diagnosis. The discussion includes nutrition, exercise, lymphedema, and weight management.

Tools & Calculators

Your Prescription for Health – Exercise is Medicine®

Research has proven that exercise has a role in the treatment and prevention of more than 40 chronic diseases. Exercise is Medicine developed this Public Action Guide to help you discuss using exercise as “medicine” with your healthcare provider, and Exercising with Cancer as a guide to help begin an exercise program. They have also partnered with the American College of Sports medicine to provide an Exercise Time Finder, allowing you to fill in your typical week and look for blocks of time where exercise is an option.

The American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR) – Tools You Can Use

The AICR has compiled a group of tools you can use to help you to implement proper nutrition and exercise, understand what your risks are, and to make necessary changes to meet your healthy lifestyle goals. This includes healthy recipes, a nutrition hotline, BMI calculator, and “The New American Plate.” This is an excellent site that gives up-to-date science-based research related to the choices we can make to decrease our cancer risk.

Stay Healthy – Tools & Calculators by the American Cancer Society

Making healthy choices such as keeping a healthy weight, eating well, and including exercise and activity in your life helps to keep cancer risk down. This link includes fitness tools and calculators such as finding your target heart rate, your body mass index (BMI), and tips for sun safety and tobacco cessation.

NIH’s Aim for a Healthy Weight Body Mass Index (BMI) Calculator

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has created this BMI Calculator as a useful measure of obesity, calculated from your weight and height. The higher your BMI, the higher your risk is for several chronic diseases, including certain cancers.

Blueprints  of Hope – Community Calendar

Join others through Live by Living walks, hikes and outings, CancerFit, Qigong, or for some yoga. When we exercise with others it isn’t just exercise, it’s a social event that keeps us from feeling isolated.  Others come to expect to see you and you may look forward to seeing them.

 

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Share

Becoming an Active Participant in Our Health Care

Portrait of the old woman on a green background

TONI ABBEY, RN, OCN | JUNE 24, 2016

Having the blessing of human body ownership brings responsibility and accountability (if only to ourselves) of keeping them well tuned. As is with our bicycles, regular maintenance is necessary if we don’t want to end-up with expensive repairs, to prolong its usefulness and maintain a semblance of quality of life as we age. If we refuse the maintenance responsibility of bike ownership, bikes can be replaced. For this body of humanness – replacement is not an option.

And so it goes, maintenance is the key to the smooth operation of our being. Participation in maintenance of our being means we are taking the steps to learn how to prevent disease, to develop an awareness of our body in its “normal” state of health, and to seek prompt medical care when we find something isn’t working as it usually has. Read More

Share

Your Next Steps

SONY DSCPeople who have finished their cancer treatments find themselves crossing a bridge into a phase of their cancer journey commonly referred to as post-treatment survivorship. There are several ways of defining survivorship and its meaning to each person is as individual as a fingerprint. To understand more about this important phase of survivorship, please read the explanation and video presented by Cancer.Net here.

Gaining knowledge and learning new tips and tools about your survivorship can empower you to live well beyond cancer.

Wendy Harpham Podcasts – On Healthy Survivorship

Wendy Harpham, MD is an internal medicine physician, an author, and national keynote speaker about healthy cancer survivorship. She is also a 28-plus year survivor of multiple recurrences of cancer. She is known as “a fierce advocate and mentor for helping patients become healthy survivors,” and having been on “both sides of the stethoscope” she truly understands the survivorship journey.

OncoLink – Cancer Survivorship: Navigating Life after Cancer

This webinar from Penn Medicine’s OncoLink regarding cancer survivorship provides information, tips and resources to help you transition from cancer patient to survivor and make the most of life post-treatment.

Dana Farber’s Integrative Therapies Education Series

Dana Farber was one of the first hospitals in the nation to begin acknowledging survivorship as a true phase of the cancer journey. Individuals who have survived cancer may face many challenges resulting from their cancer and treatments. Dana Farber has developed informative articles to educate about Integrative Therapies to help with the challenges of cancer treatment. brought together experts from many fields to talk about the variety of issues cancer survivors face, which can be accessed at Leonard P. Zakim Center for Integrative Therapies and Healthy Living. They also have wonderful Information Sheets for Cancer Survivors.

NCCS Cancer Survivor’s Toolbox® – Special Topic:  Living Beyond Cancer

This is a special topic of a series that was produced through collaboration between the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS), the Oncology Nursing Society, and the National Association of Social Workers with a grant from Genentech, Inc. Living Beyond Cancer encourages individuals to take an active role in their care and discusses a number of issues specific to life beyond cancer. Its goals are to teach skills to help survivors adapt to their new life and to help them be as healthy as possible. The Toolbox is available in English and Spanish.

FFLACTFacing Forward: Life After Cancer Treatment

The NIH National Cancer Institute has compiled this booklet for people who have finished their cancer treatments. The booklet is free and can be downloaded print or to a tablet device. The information answers questions and new concerns patients and survivors might have to help them understand what life is like after cancer treatments end.

 

 

ASCO Answers Cancer Survivorship.pdfASCO Survivorship Section on Cancer.Net

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) provides information about all things related to survivorship for cancer survivors and their friends and families. They also created ASCO Answers Guide to Cancer Survivorship, which is free and can be downloaded as a printable PDF in English or Spanish from this page. This website’s information is for anyone facing a cancer diagnosis and is oncologist-approved.

 

 

Life After Treatment The Next Chapter in the Survivorship JourneyACS – Life After Treatment: The Next Chapter in the Survivorship Journey

The American Cancer Society (ACS) displays up-to-date information related to all phases of cancer survivorship. This booklet is published by the ACS as a guide for American Indians and Alaska Natives to discuss their care after treatment, and is a free PDF download.

 

Many Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Share