Risk Reduction

You have faced cancer and, like others who have done the same, you feel motivated to review your lifestyle choices. Adopting a healthier lifestyle can help you ease the common side effects of cancer treatment and the risks for other chronic diseases or a cancer recurrence. The following information and tools can help you take control of your health and develop an action plan with your doctor to help you live a healthier, lower-risk lifestyle. For more tools to help you recover, go to our Healthy Living page.

AICR – Foods That Fight Cancerbottle

There is no single food alone that can protect you against cancer. The American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR) promotes strong evidence that an eating plan filled with a variety of plant foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains and beans helps lower the risk for many cancers.

AICR – Tips for After Cancer Treatment

The American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR) provides practical, reliable advice on what to eat and how to become active again once your cancer treatment is over. This includes support groups, recipes, and tips for healthy everyday changes that may lower risk for cancer recurrence and secondary cancers. AICR brochures, DVDs, and online tools for cancer survivorship are also available. AICR’s Guidelines for Cancer Survivors outlines their guidelines for diet, nutrition, and physical activity for cancer survivors.

AICR – Evidence of Lifestyle Links to Cancer Risk by Cancer Site

The American Institute of Cancer Research’s (AICR) evidence shows that our risk for many types of cancer is related to diet, physical activity, and weight. For some types, however, it is not yet possible to determine whether or not lifestyle plays a role. This does not mean such links are impossible, simply that more research is needed. The AICR also touts 10 Recommendations for Cancer Prevention.

ACS – Body Weight and Cancer Risk

According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), obesity, physical inactivity, poor nutrition, and excess alcohol consumption can be linked to many cancers. Being obese raises the risk of cancers recurring after treatment and can lower the chances of survival. Learn about your body mass index (BMI) and how to lower your risk.

American Cancer Society Guidelines on Nutrition and Physical Activity for Cancer Prevention

This is a condensed version of the article describing the guidelines for nutrition and physical activity for cancer prevention, which was written for health care professionals in 2012. This focus is on avoiding inactivity, maintaining a healthy weight, and consuming a healthy diet – particularly plant sources of food. Read the healthcare professionals version here.

ASCO – Prevention and Risk Reduction

This information, provided by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), promotes evidence-based prevention strategies into cancer practice. They are also committed to supporting survivors of cancer.

Dana-Farber – Cancer Prevention and Risk Reduction

The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute offers a wealth of information, including informative topics on reducing risk by cancer type, exercise, nutrition and weight management, smoking cessation after cancer treatment, understanding your genetic risk for cancer, and more. They also provide a Cancer Prevention Insights Blog with timely articles on cancer prevention. For more information on risk reduction practices see 10 Ways to Lower Your Cancer Risk by Dana-Farber.

Diet, Nutrition and Physical Activity Breast Cancer Survivors

This is a review of the recommendations for cancer prevention, which is expected to be published in 2017. This report is based on a review of literature and an expert panel discussion for breast cancer survivors.

EWG – Consumer Guides

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) has researched many items related to environmental health. These educational guides can help you make safer and better-informed decisions about the products you and your family use.

Healthy Habits for those at Risk for Lymphedema

These guidelines are developed by the National Lymphedema Network to help reduce your risk of developing lymphedema. It should be noted that these are NOT prevention guidelines. But there is little research about risk reduction, it should always be individualized by a certified lymphedema therapist and your healthcare professional. These include exercise and nutrition guidelines.

University at MD Anderson: Recommended Cancer Screening Examinations

Regular follow-up care is an important piece of your survivorship journey. In addition to seeing your oncology team, your care plan will include regular visits to your primary care provider to care for your whole person, including cancer screenings. MD Anderson has developed this list of recommended cancer screening exams to help find cancer early, when the chances for curing the disease are greater. Find out what screening exams are right for you based on age, gender, and family history. You may want to talk to your physician to make sure you are on track.

OncoLink – What’s My Risk

Penn Medicine’s risk assessment program is available to help you learn about the factors that increase and decrease your cancer risks.

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